How to Market to Architects

How to Market to Architects Featured Image

Architects are a special breed because their work forces them to combine an ambitious vision that employs aesthetics and form with the instincts of an engineer, who actually specifies the products and completes the blueprints of a given structure. Because of their nature, it can be challenging to market to them outside of traditional advertising and trade shows. Here are some ways to help architects quickly but thoroughly understand your offerings.

Think Like a Specialist

Think Like a Specialist

The more specific you can be about how your products would help augment an architect’s vision, the more successful you will be in marketing to them. Really take the time to identify the types of buildings where what you’re selling adds the most value or adds a competitive advantage. The next step is to identify the architectural firms that are best known for designing these types of buildings.

It’s also important to be specific about your product by focusing on the clear benefits—especially the aspects that make your product different from the competition. Most architects are interested in performance, aesthetics, and technical insight so it’s important to be able to speak authoritatively to all of those areas.

Learn to Teach

Learn to Teach

For many architects, the role of the building product manufacturer or service provider is to educate. In short, your job is to teach, to guide, and to provide advice. The more you can make yourself an invaluable resource, the better your reputation, your network, and your bottom line will become.

Madico is an American Institute of Architects (AIA) Approved Provider and has window film courses available for architects to take and earn their mandatory credential credits. Talk to your Madico representative to learn more about coordinating a lunch and learn with an architecture firm in your area.

Be There When They Need You

Be There When They Need You

The author Neil Gaiman once said that to be successful as a freelance writer, you have to write well, be easy to work with, and turn in your work on time—but you only have to be two out of those three things at a time. Architects follow the same pattern.

The keys to success include being there when they’re looking, ensuring that your company shows up on search engines, social platforms, and word-of-mouth. Remember that you are not marketing to all architects—only those who need your help right now. The easier it is to deal with you, it’s more likely an architect will return to you for future projects.

Styles Evolve

Styles Evolve

What’s the number one desire among architects? It’s to make their buildings stand out. That means that architects will buy products or services from companies that inspire them. Be original. The more you can grasp an architect’s attention with an unexpected approach and dynamic use of your product, the better.

It’s important to remember that styles evolve, if slowly. Manufacturers whose products either conform to new trends or build standards or have the capacity for malleability can offer an architect ways to either solve a unique problem or solve a common problem in a unique way. Bear in mind that these new applications may be based on either performance or aesthetics, or both.

Show, Don’t Tell

Show Don't Tell

When an architect needs specific products for large projects, the most important factors for them are first, what it looks like, and secondly, how the product performs. A good first step is to set up an information hub on your website for architects to quickly study. Videos, infographics, and interactive 3D models can all help show architects how your product or service works in the overall built environment.

By following these steps and tailoring them to your particular strengths, you’ll be better able to demonstrate how your product or service contributes to the bigger picture. This approach should help architects better understand your product or service and encourage them to specify you over another brand.

This entry was posted in Dealer Support, Marketing, Sales & Marketing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.